Why do certain animal species have whiskers?


Whiskers are primarily sensory organs that aid animals in learning about their surroundings. A unique channel is fed by dense packets of nerves that are located at the base of each whisker and take up minute vibrations. 

They are used to detect objects and air currents and warn people of impending risks, especially at night. The objectives for which various species employ their whiskers vary slightly. Many predators utilize them to find prey, including seals and shrews. 

 

Rats have the ability to move their whiskers quickly as they survey their environment to create mental maps. They help cats determine whether they can fit into tight spaces. Additionally, the function of whiskers can be social; for instance, dogs' flaring out of the whiskers is a sign of anxiety.

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